Jump to content
  • Sky
  • Blueberry
  • Slate
  • Violet
  • Watermelon
  • Strawberry
  • Maroon
  • Orange
  • Gold
  • Emerald
  • Chocolate
  • Charcoal

Welcome to the upgraded message boards!  Please note: if you have been using a username to sign in that is different than the handle (display name) displayed on the boards, you must now sign in with either your handle (display name) or the email address associated with your account.  If you don't know what this means, then it probably doesn't affect you!

Sign in to follow this  
lilc3

The Prevention of Sports Injuries

Recommended Posts

Breaking bones. Spraining ankles. Pulling ligaments. Tearing ACL's, PCL's, and MCL's. What can be done? They all seem to be such inevitable occurances. Does anyone have the answers? theres got to be a way to prevent them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Breaking bones. Spraining ankles. Pulling ligaments. Tearing ACL's, PCL's, and MCL's. What can be done? They all seem to be such inevitable occurances. Does anyone have the answers? theres got to be a way to prevent them.

There has been numerous tests on Ankle Braces, knee pads, Warming up techniques, weight training, ideas on round the year conditioning, etc that have been made the some in PT might share or Trainers who might give some ideas that would help players get thru seasons to help cut down on the injury aspect of Athletics. Being at a Volleyball Club last night, it really surprised me of the strenous aspects a young athlete has to go thru now even with a sport traditionally thought of as a non contact thus not very suseptable to injuries. That is not the case as the conditioning and stretching, jumping and quickness is something that does cause injuries so some help in 'Athletics all way around would be of help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Breaking bones. Spraining ankles. Pulling ligaments. Tearing ACL's, PCL's, and MCL's. What can be done? They all seem to be such inevitable occurances. Does anyone have the answers? theres got to be a way to prevent them.

 

Don't Play. That's the only way to completely avoid injuries. But I don't find that to be too much fun. Train hard and work on flexibility(which they haven't found as a significant link to avoiding injuries). Besides that you have genetics and luck. Can't do much about that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Year round weight training and flexibility training done the right way is the best avoidance. Girls are more likely to tear an ACL or other knee ligaments. Weight training is no longer used to bulk up but to prevent injuries, if done the right way. Training can also be harmful if the coach or trainer does not know proper technique.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Year round weight training and flexibility training done the right way is the best avoidance. Girls are more likely to tear an ACL or other knee ligaments. Weight training is no longer used to bulk up but to prevent injuries, if done the right way. Training can also be harmful if the coach or trainer does not know proper technique.

Good post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Year round weight training and flexibility training done the right way is the best avoidance. Girls are more likely to tear an ACL or other knee ligaments. Weight training is no longer used to bulk up but to prevent injuries, if done the right way. Training can also be harmful if the coach or trainer does not know proper technique.

 

Honestly, just wondering if you're involved in the medical field at all? If so, question - can an athlete "over train"? Is running until total exhaustion a good idea, at the point where the athlete is literally only trying to stay on their feet?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, just wondering if you're involved in the medical field at all? If so, question - can an athlete "over train"? Is running until total exhaustion a good idea, at the point where the athlete is literally only trying to stay on their feet?

 

There is such thing as "overtraining". Your body needs rest to be involved in any type of athletics. Working out 7 days a week is just too much. It's good to take days off from weight lifting because muscle is gained while your body is resting. You should stretch BEFORE and AFTER EVERY workout. The more flexible you are the less likely you are to get injured. As far as preventing ACL injuries there is not a brace on the market that can completely prevent someone from injuring their ACL. Females do have higher injury rate to the ACL because they have an increased Q angle, different size of the femoral notch, and hormonal influences. Plyometeric training is one of the best ways to help the body get ready for the physical strain athletics places on the body. Plyometric exercises are designed to help with speed and explosion. Most athletes don't know how to "land" when they jump. I have seen, in my experiences, a basketball player will "land" with their legs locked. I most commonly see this in females as opposed to males. This places the ACL at a very high risk because one mechanism for an ACL tear is a hyperexteded knee. Also, just because you do everything to get ready for a season doesn't necessarily mean you will be injury free, but it will help. Coaches are starting to realize now that shorter practices, days off, and proper off-season workouts will also help with preventing injuries. Some schools have Certified Athletic Trainers who are educated and trained to specialize in preventing, rehabing, assessing, and treating injuries. I would suggest if you have any questions or concerns to address them with your Athletic Trainer. Any more questions please ask /thumb[1].gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":thumb:" border="0" alt="thumb[1].gif" />

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Certainly, there are things that people say you can do to help prevent injuries and it may help if only mentally, but a top orthopedic surgeon known to many once talked about it like this to me. He said that girls are simply not physically made to play sports. He went on to say this does not mean that they are not gifted athletes and will continue to be, he was speaking from a purely physiological standpoint. The ratio of knee injuries is two to five times (ACL) higher rate girls than boys. The good doctor went on to say that in all probability this will continue. An example Vicki Baugh of the Lady Vols, a truly gifted athlete with unlimited potential. She tore her ACL for the second time in less than a year last Tuesday. This player was bull strong athletic as they come and her future as one of the Lady Vol greats would have surprised no one. But now, she will be very fortunate indeed to regain her former playing status due to devastating knee injuries. She is only nineteen or twenty year old. This is a women's sports fact of life. I am all for any safe prevention exercises and drills that may help to slow down the occurence of injuries. But it won't change the physiological realities of being female and playing hard physical sports, there are going to be injuries at a much higher rate than male athletes. /smile.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="smile.gif" />

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is such thing as "overtraining". Your body needs rest to be involved in any type of athletics. Working out 7 days a week is just too much. It's good to take days off from weight lifting because muscle is gained while your body is resting. You should stretch BEFORE and AFTER EVERY workout. The more flexible you are the less likely you are to get injured. As far as preventing ACL injuries there is not a brace on the market that can completely prevent someone from injuring their ACL. Females do have higher injury rate to the ACL because they have an increased Q angle, different size of the femoral notch, and hormonal influences. Plyometeric training is one of the best ways to help the body get ready for the physical strain athletics places on the body. Plyometric exercises are designed to help with speed and explosion. Most athletes don't know how to "land" when they jump. I have seen, in my experiences, a basketball player will "land" with their legs locked. I most commonly see this in females as opposed to males. This places the ACL at a very high risk because one mechanism for an ACL tear is a hyperexteded knee. Also, just because you do everything to get ready for a season doesn't necessarily mean you will be injury free, but it will help. Coaches are starting to realize now that shorter practices, days off, and proper off-season workouts will also help with preventing injuries. Some schools have Certified Athletic Trainers who are educated and trained to specialize in preventing, rehabing, assessing, and treating injuries. I would suggest if you have any questions or concerns to address them with your Athletic Trainer. Any more questions please ask /thumb[1].gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":thumb:" border="0" alt="thumb[1].gif" />

 

The overtraining statement doesn't apply to football or hundred plus degree practice. But it must have applied after a look at the season record that year. I am anxiously awaiting your prediction for 2009-2010 on the football site. /roflol.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":roflol:" border="0" alt="roflol.gif" /> /roflol.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":roflol:" border="0" alt="roflol.gif" />

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The overtraining statement doesn't apply to football or hundred plus degree practice. But it must have applied after a look at the season record that year. I am anxiously awaiting your prediction for 2009-2010 on the football site. /roflol.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":roflol:" border="0" alt="roflol.gif" /> /roflol.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":roflol:" border="0" alt="roflol.gif" />

 

I know it's difficult for you, but could you please stay on topic here!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is such thing as "overtraining". Your body needs rest to be involved in any type of athletics. Working out 7 days a week is just too much. It's good to take days off from weight lifting because muscle is gained while your body is resting. You should stretch BEFORE and AFTER EVERY workout. The more flexible you are the less likely you are to get injured. As far as preventing ACL injuries there is not a brace on the market that can completely prevent someone from injuring their ACL. Females do have higher injury rate to the ACL because they have an increased Q angle, different size of the femoral notch, and hormonal influences. Plyometeric training is one of the best ways to help the body get ready for the physical strain athletics places on the body. Plyometric exercises are designed to help with speed and explosion. Most athletes don't know how to "land" when they jump. I have seen, in my experiences, a basketball player will "land" with their legs locked. I most commonly see this in females as opposed to males. This places the ACL at a very high risk because one mechanism for an ACL tear is a hyperexteded knee. Also, just because you do everything to get ready for a season doesn't necessarily mean you will be injury free, but it will help. Coaches are starting to realize now that shorter practices, days off, and proper off-season workouts will also help with preventing injuries. Some schools have Certified Athletic Trainers who are educated and trained to specialize in preventing, rehabing, assessing, and treating injuries. I would suggest if you have any questions or concerns to address them with your Athletic Trainer. Any more questions please ask /thumb[1].gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":thumb:" border="0" alt="thumb[1].gif" />

 

 

Well but! Overstraining has hurt a lot of players. For instance our team practices 6 to 7 days a week for 2.5-3.0 hours. During the summer they are encourage to play AAU basketball long with participating in there school summer program. Which requires a strenuous running exercise. Also, I can??™t see the purpose of 2 a days, specially when they have worked all summer and fall. Because of the none stop breaks the kids are drain physically and mentally . I feel that exhaustion has cause several injuries for our team: 4 knee injuries which cause surgeries, a shoulder injury, two leg injuries. The kids are encourage to start back before they have a chance to heal. Coaches also play the psychological game with our children, telling them to stink it up, be tuff, push yourself . And don't get sick- you have to come to practice even if you don't attend school, have a fever or even throwing up. THE LINE MUST BE DRAWN. Our kids must speak up and not feel intimidated or treated with a consequences, for not being able to continue at a certain pace. The COACHES AND ATELETIC DIRECTOR must respect our kids by giving their body a chance to rest and stop pushing them beyond unnecessary limits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well but! Overstraining has hurt a lot of players. For instance our team practices 6 to 7 days a week for 2.5-3.0 hours. During the summer they are encourage to play AAU basketball long with participating in there school summer program. Which requires a strenuous running exercise. Also, I can??™t see the purpose of 2 a days, specially when they have worked all summer and fall. Because of the none stop breaks the kids are drain physically and mentally . I feel that exhaustion has cause several injuries for our team: 4 knee injuries which cause surgeries, a shoulder injury, two leg injuries. The kids are encourage to start back before they have a chance to heal. Coaches also play the psychological game with our children, telling them to stink it up, be tuff, push yourself . And don't get sick- you have to come to practice even if you don't attend school, have a fever or even throwing up. THE LINE MUST BE DRAWN. Our kids must speak up and not feel intimidated or treated with a consequences, for not being able to continue at a certain pace. The COACHES AND ATELETIC DIRECTOR must respect our kids by giving their body a chance to rest and stop pushing them beyond unnecessary limits.

 

Does your school have an Athletic Trainer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

Announcements



×