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Justpruitt27

William blount host lenior city week 1

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12 hours ago, TheGuvna said:

TheGuvna has had a change of heart because the orange koolaid has arrived. The Govs will send the Wamplers back across the dam with a loss.

Now thair's tha '91 we all reemimburr.....:thumb:

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8 hours ago, STARSNBARS said:

Now thair's tha '91 we all reemimburr.....:thumb:

Starz,

I was told the Govs have been hiding plays and not showing a lot in scrimmages and the jamboree. I even heard they were running vaniller schemes. I'm not sure what that means, but I'm guessing it means they will run chocolate schemes agin Luh-Nore City.  :popcorneater:

Edited by TheGuvna
.

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On 8/12/2018 at 7:09 PM, TheGuvna said:

Ever heard of a "figure of speech?"

Top 20 Figures of Speech

Using original figures of speech in our writing is a way to convey meanings in fresh, unexpected ways. Figures can help our readers understand and stay interested in what we have to say. 

1. Alliteration: The repetition of an initial consonant sound. Example: She sells seashells by the seashore.

2. Anaphora: The repetition of the same word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses or verses. Example: Unfortunately, I was in the wrong place at the wrong time on the wrong day. 

3. Antithesis: The juxtaposition of contrasting ideas in balanced phrases. Example:As Abraham Lincoln said, "Folks who have no vices have very few virtues."

4. Apostrophe: Directly addressing a nonexistent person or an inanimate object as though it were a living being. Example: "Oh, you stupid car, you never work when I need you to," Bert sighed.

5. Assonance: Identity or similarity in sound between internal vowels in neighboring words. Example: How now, brown cow?

6. Chiasmus: A verbal pattern in which the second half of an expression is balanced against the first but with the parts reversed. Example: The famous chef said people should live to eat, not eat to live.

7. Euphemism: The substitution of an inoffensive term for one considered offensively explicit. Example: "We're teaching our toddler how to go potty," Bob said.

8. Hyperbole: An extravagant statement; the use of exaggerated terms for the purpose of emphasis or heightened effect. Example: I have a ton of things to do when I get home.

9. Irony: The use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning. Also, a statement or situation where the meaning is contradicted by the appearance or presentation of the idea. Example: "Oh, I love spending big bucks," said my dad, a notorious penny pincher.
 
10. Litotes: A figure of speech consisting of an understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by negating its opposite. Example: A million dollars is no small chunk of change.

11. Metaphor: An implied comparison between two dissimilar things that have something in common. Example: "All the world's a stage."

12. Metonymy: A figure of speech in a word or phrase is substituted for another with which it's closely associated; also, the rhetorical strategy of describing something indirectly by referring to things around it. Example: "That stuffed suit with the briefcase is a poor excuse for a salesman," the manager said angrily.

13. Onomatopoeia: The use of words that imitate the sounds associated with the objects or actions they refer to. Example: The clap of thunder went bang and scared my poor dog.

14. Oxymoron: A figure of speech in which incongruous or contradictory terms appear side by side. Example: "He popped the jumbo shrimp in his mouth."

15. Paradox: A statement that appears to contradict itself. Example: "This is the beginning of the end," said Eeyore, always the pessimist.

16. Personification: A figure of speech in which an inanimate object or abstraction is endowed with human qualities or abilities. Example: That kitchen knife will take a bite out of your hand if you don't handle it safely.

17. Pun: A play on words, sometimes on different senses of the same word and sometimes on the similar sense or sound of different words. Example: Jessie looked up from her breakfast and said, "A boiled egg every morning is hard to beat."

18. Simile: A stated comparison (usually formed with "like" or "as") between two fundamentally dissimilar things that have certain qualities in common. Example:Roberto was white as a sheet after he walked out of the horror movie.

19. Synecdoche: A figure of speech in which a part is used to represent the whole. Example: Tina is learning her ABC's in preschool.

20. Understatement: A figure of speech in which a writer or speaker deliberately makes a situation seem less important or serious than it is. Example: "You could say Babe Ruth was a decent ballplayer," the reporter said with a wink.

Edited by Red Rebels

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24 minutes ago, Red Rebels said:

Top 20 Figures of Speech

Using original figures of speech in our writing is a way to convey meanings in fresh, unexpected ways. Figures can help our readers understand and stay interested in what we have to say. 

 

1. Alliteration: The repetition of an initial consonant sound. Example: She sells seashells by the seashore.

 

2. Anaphora: The repetition of the same word or phrase at the beginning of successive clauses or verses. Example: Unfortunately, I was in the wrong place at the wrong time on the wrong day. 

 

3. Antithesis: The juxtaposition of contrasting ideas in balanced phrases. Example:As Abraham Lincoln said, "Folks who have no vices have very few virtues."

 

4. Apostrophe: Directly addressing a nonexistent person or an inanimate object as though it were a living being. Example: "Oh, you stupid car, you never work when I need you to," Bert sighed.

5. Assonance: Identity or similarity in sound between internal vowels in neighboring words. Example: How now, brown cow?

 

6. Chiasmus: A verbal pattern in which the second half of an expression is balanced against the first but with the parts reversed. Example: The famous chef said people should live to eat, not eat to live.

 

7. Euphemism: The substitution of an inoffensive term for one considered offensively explicit. Example: "We're teaching our toddler how to go potty," Bob said.

 

8. Hyperbole: An extravagant statement; the use of exaggerated terms for the purpose of emphasis or heightened effect. Example: I have a ton of things to do when I get home.

 

9. Irony: The use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning. Also, a statement or situation where the meaning is contradicted by the appearance or presentation of the idea. Example: "Oh, I love spending big bucks," said my dad, a notorious penny pincher.

 

10. Litotes: A figure of speech consisting of an understatement in which an affirmative is expressed by negating its opposite. Example: A million dollars is no small chunk of change.

 

11. Metaphor: An implied comparison between two dissimilar things that have something in common. Example: "All the world's a stage."

 

12. Metonymy: A figure of speech in a word or phrase is substituted for another with which it's closely associated; also, the rhetorical strategy of describing something indirectly by referring to things around it. Example: "That stuffed suit with the briefcase is a poor excuse for a salesman," the manager said angrily.

 

13. Onomatopoeia: The use of words that imitate the sounds associated with the objects or actions they refer to. Example: The clap of thunder went bang and scared my poor dog.

 

14. Oxymoron: A figure of speech in which incongruous or contradictory terms appear side by side. Example: "He popped the jumbo shrimp in his mouth."

 

15. Paradox: A statement that appears to contradict itself. Example: "This is the beginning of the end," said Eeyore, always the pessimist.

 

16. Personification: A figure of speech in which an inanimate object or abstraction is endowed with human qualities or abilities. Example: That kitchen knife will take a bite out of your hand if you don't handle it safely.

 

17. Pun: A play on words, sometimes on different senses of the same word and sometimes on the similar sense or sound of different words. Example: Jessie looked up from her breakfast and said, "A boiled egg every morning is hard to beat."

 

18. Simile: A stated comparison (usually formed with "like" or "as") between two fundamentally dissimilar things that have certain qualities in common. Example:Roberto was white as a sheet after he walked out of the horror movie.

 

19. Synecdoche: A figure of speech in which a part is used to represent the whole. Example: Tina is learning her ABC's in preschool.

 

20. Understatement: A figure of speech in which a writer or speaker deliberately makes a situation seem less important or serious than it is. Example: "You could say Babe Ruth was a decent ballplayer," the reporter said with a wink.

91...you asked for it. 

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3 hours ago, TheGuvna said:

Starz,

I was told the Govs have been hiding plays and not showing a lot in scrimmages and the jamboree. I even heard they were running vaniller schemes. I'm not sure what that means, but I'm guessing it means they will run chocolate schemes agin Luh-Nore City.  :popcorneater:

91 ewe add sum strawburry two thait and Will-Yum Blunt weal bee runnin' tha Nay-pole-lee-un offence agin Lynn Orr City.......:popcorneater:

 

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Well I heard Satterfield wasn't with the Wampler's anymore as of a week ago so that would have a bearing on this game as well or at least to me. I do know having him aboard last year helped them come out of nowhere. Still will be a good game and lots of good food on the grill.

24ex4wl.jpg

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29 minutes ago, Shadroach said:

Wonder if we could come up with $96,415.69 in mysterious cash and $10K in fuel like Blackman HS did maybe we could Shadcruit some top caliber coaches and win some games this year.

:huh:

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2 hours ago, BarneySox2007 said:

Well I heard Satterfield wasn't with the Wampler's anymore as of a week ago so that would have a bearing on this game as well or at least to me. I do know having him aboard last year helped them come out of nowhere. Still will be a good game and lots of good food on the grill.

24ex4wl.jpg

Did you hear where he went? Cozart isn't on the staff this year either.

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35 minutes ago, LCVolman said:

Did you hear where he went? Cozart isn't on the staff this year either.

No I sure didn't. The person that told me usually hears from all the good connections so I really didn't ask anymore. They were the one that volunteered that info when I mentioned Cozart wasn't there any longer. Not surprising because Bill seems to move around like a checker. Great coach if there ever was one and I'm sure he sure helped out a lot last year.

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